Life-threatening floods to strike as bomb cyclone causes chaos

MET Office: Jet stream from snow and freeze in the US to blast UK

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Britons have been warned to brace themselves for “life-threatening” floods and snow. The Met Office has issued an amber alert for heavy rain for rain in parts of Dumfries and Galloway as well as the Scottish Borders.

Weather forecasters are warning people to expect around 40-50mm of rain in the area. Fast-flowing or deep floodwater is also expected which could cause danger to life.

A yellow warning for rain is in place in much of the central belt and southern parts of Scotland.

Yellow warnings for snow and ice are also in place across much of the north of Scotland. Some roads and railways will be affected with longer journey times by road, bus and train services.

The Met Office said there will be icy patches on some untreated roads, pavements and cycle paths.

Motorists have been warned of potentially difficult driving conditions and delays or cancellations to train and bus services.

The Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) has also issued 10 flood alerts and 20 warnings across Scotland including Pollok Country Park in Glasgow.

River levels are expected to rise as a result of heavy overnight rainfall with levels peaking during daylight hours on Friday.

Network Rail warned speed restrictions could be in place which will extend journey times as temperatures fall to minus 11C in some areas of the Highlands.

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Police Scotland said there is a high risk of disruption and urged people to plan ahead and drive to the conditions if they have to travel.

The Scottish Government said the Multi-Agency Response Team will monitor conditions throughout the amber warning period.

The Met Office said the deadly bomb cyclone that sent temperatures plunging in the US is causing wet and windy weather in the UK.

The deadly storm left thousands without power as temperatures plummeted to dangerously low levels.

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Met Office meteorologist Simon Partridge said: “The UK weather is going to remain unsettled with further spells of wet and windy weather due to the strengthening of the jet stream because of the weather in the US.

“The effect it’s having on the UK is nowhere near as dramatic because that system has brought up a lot of cold air further south, across the US.

“Indeed, the cyclone is only having an effect on the UK due to its impact on the North Atlantic jet stream.

“What effect (the bomb cyclone) has had is to strengthen the jet stream, because the jet stream is basically driven by temperature differences.

“So the starker the difference in temperature between the northern edge of it and southern edge, the stronger the jet stream becomes.”

He said the knock-on effect for the UK is spells of wet and windy weather over the next seven to 10 days.

Weather charts show more wind, rain and snow heading towards the UK next month.

Jim Dale, global meteorologist, said: “This looks like a typical, deep Atlantic low pressure system, bringing wintry conditions to Scotland, the north of England and Northern Ireland.

“If it results in what we’re seeing at this moment in time, then there will be blizzards over the Highlands and Grampians. It’s a step back to the wintry conditions we saw before Christmas. It will be colder everywhere.”

He said winds would be gale to severe gale with 50 to 70mph winds across northern areas and maybe 40 to 50mph in the south.

Mr Dale added temperatures for January 8 are tracking towards 0C or maybe lower in the Scottish Highlands with 5C to 6C in other areas, though it will feel colder in the wind in some areas.

On the looming low pressure system, Mr Dale said: “It’s too far away to be certain at this time, but it’s one that needs watching. We’re heading into storm season 2023. This is early days compared to last year’s storm season when we saw six to seven storms in January and February.

“It could be a named storm with the potential for destruction and disruption, but we’ll have to wait and see. It’s early days. It’s not a revisit of the Troll from Trondheim. It’s a typical, deep Atlantic low, tracking to the north of Scotland.”

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