Putin red-faced as Russian tank destroyed by deadly Ukrainian Stugna anti-tank missiles

Russian tank targeted by Ukrainian forces in Donbass

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The news comes as Russian forces advance ever deeper into Ukrainian territory in the east of the war-torn nation. More than 1,300 Russian tanks have already been destroyed in the war, Ukrainian reports suggest, with the latest being yet another humiliating blow to Moscow.

Anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs) are large, tripod — or vehicle-mounted weapons capable of destroying heavily armoured main battle tanks from a distance of over a mile.

These weapon systems have given stiff resistance to the heavily mechanised Russian military which relies on ageing tanks and armoured personnel carriers.

Ukraine has also claimed over 3,300 APC’s have been reduced to scrap since the start of the conflict.

Kyiv’s military has received anti-tank guided missiles in thousands from several countries, with the British Javelin system being a fine example.

However, Ukraine is using a home-grown ATGM known as the Stugna-P in even greater numbers.

A Ukrainian defence ministry spokesperson commenting on the Stugna missiles said: “Due to the combat work of the Stugna-P anti-tank missile systems, the Russian occupiers will not hide anywhere.”

In the latest images obtained from the 24th Brigade in Ukraine, two Russian tanks can be seen in the crosshairs of the system, resulting in the destruction of the vehicles by the missile.

The first shows a huge ball of fire igniting from the tank which is located next to a building.

A second image shows another explosion with the same crosshairs proving fatal accuracy against its target.

Each guided Stugna guided missile launcher weighs in at just over 100kg, and has an impressive range of just over 4 miles.

Each projectile has a diameter of 155mm and fuses on impact with the target.

A three to four-person team is optimal for deploying the Stugna.

Operators require specially-made backpacks.

Once the missile is fired, the operator controls the Stugna and corrects the aim when needed, by using the joystick on the remote control.

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Stugna’s system has a shelf life of 15 years.

The missiles have a 10-year shelf life.

As the war has moved to the Donbas and fighting has changed from wooded areas to open plains, the missile has been fitted to light vehicles to make it mobile.

The Stugna-P is being used in the same way US forces used the TOW missile system in the 1980s and the Gulf War Desert Patrol Vehicle.

Its increased range gives it an edge over the NLAW and Javelin missiles.

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